Saturday, October 14, 2017

Faust (1926)


FAUST
F. W. Murnau
1926 • 106 Minutes • 1.33 : 1 • Germany
UFA


Cast: Gösta Ekman, Emil Jannings, Camilla Horn, Wilhelm Dieterle, Frida Richard, Yvette Guilbert
Screenplay: Hans Kyser based on the play by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Cinematography: Carl Hoffmann
Produced: Erich Pommer

THE SCREEN SENSATION OF TWO CONTINENTS!


Earth and sky shall surely quake, when the dead themselves awake, answers to the Lord to take. When the court is held in sway, hiding shall no longer pay, all must out on Judgement Day!

A beautifully shot lyrical film of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe play.  God and the Devil are in an epic battle for the fate of the Earth and they wager the outcome on the soul of Faust, a learned alchemist. Faust, at first, just wants to help his people as a pestilence sweeps his city but Satan soon tempts him with youth, love and power. Faust gives in to his base desires, and the Devil is winning the battle. Can Satan fully corrupt Faust? Or will Faust find redemption, and in turn, salvation? 

The film is filled with beautiful imagery that seems to only be found in German expressionist films of the era.  A heavily special-effects laden film for the era, throughout the narrative we see the horsemen of the apocalypse, burning letters etched into the soul contract and ominous hooded figures. It's a feast for the eyes, and is essential viewing for its shot compositions alone. The atmosphere Murnau creates is haunting.  Very few inter-titles are used, with the story relying heavily on its visuals. At the time, it was the most expensive German film ever produced, only to be surpassed by Metropolis a year later. Fittingly, both films are credited with seriously contributing to the early visual effects industry.  The film is also said to have inspired the "Night on Bald Mountain" sequence from 1940's Fantasia.

Emil Jannings, usually a somewhat hammy actor, puts his over-the-top antics to wonderful use here as the evil dark lord Satan, imposing a menacing presence throughout the film. The rest of the cast is solid, but overshadowed greatly by Jannings.

The last major film Murnau produced in Germany before his debut in the United States with the Academy Award winning Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans in 1927.





Sunday, September 24, 2017

The Essential Films Podcast Episode #015: E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982)



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EPISODE DESCRIPTION

We’ll...be….right….HERE. On today’s podcast adventure, Adolfo and Mark discuss the 1982 Steven Spielberg classic: E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL! On this week’s show:


  • More Alamo Drafthouse adventures from Mark
  • Unoriginal cosplayers
  • Our thoughts on the passings of Jerry Lewis, Harry Dean Stanton and Tobe Hooper
  • The infamous unreleased Jerry Lewis film THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED
  • Harry Dean Stanton should get a posthumous Academy Award nomination for LUCKY
  • “Avenge me!”
  • The 35th Anniversary of E.T.
  • When did we first experience E.T.
  • Probably the greatest family film of all time
  • Last day of school movies
  • The long stretches of time we went before rewatching the film
  • How the film is entrenched in pop culture
  • Experiencing it again for the “first time”
  • The movie still works on 2017 audiences
  • ET and Elliot going across the moon is the most iconic image in cinema
  • Kids smoking and swearing in family films
  • Why did you drop the pizza Elliot?!
  • The origins of E.T. from the mind of a young Steven Spielberg
  • How 1941’s production problems helped pave the way for E.T.
  • 1941: Spielberg’s worst film
  • Columbia passed on E.T.
  • The tragic mistake of M&Ms 
  • Reese’s Pieces!
  • Mark’s INCORRECT opinion on Reese’s Pieces VS M&Ms
  • E.T. taught kids how to play hooky from school
  • The cuteness of young Drew Barrymore
  • Why don’t we see the adult’s faces for half the film?
  • The trauma of frog dissection
  • Henry Thomas delivers one of the great child actor performances
  • Harrison Ford’s deleted cameo
  • TV versions of movies re-adding deleted scenes
  • The 20th Anniversary version
  • Walkie Talkies are not guns
  • Practical effects are always better than digital
  • Why the film was shot in chronological order
  • E.T. 2: NOCTURNAL FEARS
  • E.T.’s cameo in STAR WARS
  • The biggest movie of all time until 1993 when Spielberg beat the box office record again with JURASSIC PARK
  • E.T. The Atari Game
  • E.T. Adventure @ Universal Studios… kind of a lame ride.
  • “Penis breath!”
  • “Wolfman’s got nards!”
  • We’re not ready for 4K yet



FILM REFERENCES IN THIS EPISODE:


  • GONE WITH THE WIND (1939)
  • CITIZEN KANE (1941)
  • THE QUIET MAN (1952)
  • ARTISTS AND MODELS (1955)
  • CINDERFELLA (1960)
  • PSYCHO (1960)
  • THE LADIES MAN (1961)
  • THE NUTTY PROFESSOR (1963)
  • THE SOUND OF MUSIC (1965)
  • COOL HAND LUKE (1967)
  • 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968)
  • A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (1971)
  • THE GODFATHER (1972)
  • THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE (1974)
  • JAWS (1975)
  • KING KONG (1976)
  • CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND (1977)
  • STAR WARS (1977)
  • HALLOWEEN (1978)
  • ALIEN (1979)
  • 1941 (1979)
  • ALTERED STATES (1980)
  • THE SHINING (1980)
  • ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK (1981)
  • RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981)
  • THE KING OF COMEDY (1982)
  • FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (1982)
  • POLTERGEIST (1982)
  • TRON (1982)
  • CHRISTINE (1983)
  • PARIS, TEXAS (1984)
  • RED DAWN (1984)
  • REPO MAN (1984)
  • INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM (1984)
  • GREMLINS (1984)
  • FIRESTARTER (1984)
  • A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (1984)
  • BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985)
  • THE GOONIES (1985)
  • PRETTY IN PINK (1986)
  • FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF (1986)
  • STAND BY ME (1986)
  • THE MONSTER SQUAD (1987)
  • FULL METAL JACKET (1987)
  • BIG (1988)
  • STEPHEN KING’S IT (1990)
  • JURASSIC PARK (1993)
  • PULP FICTION (1994)
  • JINGLE ALL THE WAY (1996)
  • STAR WARS: EPISODE I - THE PHANTOM MENACE (1999)
  • THE LADIES MAN (2000)
  • SUPER 8 (2011)
  • THE AVENGERS (2012)
  • MAX ROSE (2013)
  • STRANGER THINGS (TV Series, 2016)
  • IT (2017)
  • LUCKY (2017)
  • SPIDER-MAN HOMECOMING (2017)



SOCIAL MEDIA
TWITTER: @EssentialFilms, @FPMoviePodcast, @Adolfo_Acosta, @Sportsguy515
FACEBOOK: The Essential Films

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Frankenstein (1910)



FRANKENSTEIN
J. Searle Dawley
1910 • 14 Minutes • 1.33 :1 • United States
Edison Manufacturing Company

Cast: Augustus Phillips, Charles Ogle, Mary Fuller
Written by: J. Searle Dawley Based on Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Described as a "liberal adaptation" of the Frankenstein story by Edison, the film packs a lot into its 14 minute runtime. The film wastes no time in getting right to the good stuff, practically skipping right to the experiment.  Instead of lightning bringing the monster to life, you see the monster materialize from skeleton to flesh. The special effects for the time are quite impressive and terrifying. The film is in the public domain, which you can check out below.

The Haunted Castle (1896)



The #CountdownToHalloween continues with our #HistoryOfHorror

THE HAUNTED CASTLE (1896)
Director: Georges Méliès
Writer: Georges Méliès
Starring: Jeanne d'Alcy, Jules-Eugène Legris, Georges Méliès

Genre: Haunted House

One of the earliest examples of horror on film comes from the imagination of Georges Méliès. Clocking in at a little over 3 minutes, Méliès packs a lot into the single shot short film. A bat bursts through a window in a castle and transforms into Mephistopheles. What follows is a series of in-camera magic tricks as the devil conjures up a series of supernatural creatures.

Sunday, August 27, 2017

The Essential Films of Jerry Lewis


On August 20, 2017, Hollywood lost a comedic screen icon when Jerry Lewis passed away at age 91 due to cardiac disease.  Lewis was an active entertainer for over 70 years, with a long career spanning stage, screen and television. Lewis first rose to prominence as one half of the Martin & Lewis comedy duo with Dean Martin, making audiences laughs with no less than 14 movies until they broke up in 1956. These films included ARTISTS AND MODELS (1955), HOLLYWOOD OR BUST (1956), SCARED STIFF (1953), AT WAR WITH THE ARMY (1950) and THE CADDY (1953). From there, Lewis went solo not only as an actor but as a writer, producer and director as well. He successfully helmed many box office winners features including THE NUTTY PROFESSOR (1963), THE LADIES MAN (1961), THE BELLBOY (1960), THE PATSY (1964) and THE ERRAND BOY (1961). Among his many directorial efforts there is also the mysterious THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED, a film that Lewis considered so awful he would not release it to the general public, and to this day has only been seen by a select few number of people. After that his appearances on film became few and far between, focusing mostly on his charitable work with Muscular Distrophy, though he did make the occasional film, most notably in Martin Scorsese's THE KING OF COMEDY (1982). His last film was 2016 heist film THE TRUST, starring alongside Elijah Wood and Nicholas Cage. What follows is a list of his most notable work that should be considered essential viewing.

I've had great success being a total idiot.

ARTISTS AND MODELS
1955 • Frank Tashlin
Paramount Pictures

Cast: Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Dorothy Malone, Shirley MacLaine, Eva Gabor, Anita Ekberg, Eddie Mayehoff
Screenplay: Frank Tashlin, Herbert Baker, Hal Kanter

Rick and Eugene are two consistently out-of-work roommates. Rick (Martin) is a painter and a smooth-talking con man, while Eugene (Lewis) is a bumbling man-child who aspires to be a children's author. Eugene is obsessed with a comic book called "The Bat Lady", and that obsession leads to vivid nightmares of which wackily he narrates out loud in his sleep, much to Rick's chagrin. As luck would have the two friends just happen to live one apartment down from the Bat Lady's creator Abby Parker (Mallone) and her model Bessie (Shirley MacLaine). Rick falls for Abby and tries to seduce her while simultaneously conning her out of her job as writer/artist of the comic, using Eugene's crazy dreams as new, more sensational plot lines. Eugene, while infatuated with The Bat Lady, spends the majority of the film ducking the man-crazy advances of Bessie, whom he met earlier in the story dressed as Bat Lady herself. Confused? Convoluted? Well, throw in a Soviet espionage plot that comes out of left field and an elaborate musical number that doesn't really make any sense within the context of the story, and you've got yourself a classic Martin and Lewis film. Admittedly, this is my first introduction to Lewis' brand of slapstick comedy and his chemistry with Dean Martin. While this comedy style is very broad and an acquired taste, there are a few moments that stand out: particulary a sequence where Lewis, his bottom half replaced by a dummy, is massaged into impossible positions by an unwitting nurse. She is soon joined by Rick and several other nurse and all parties involved get stuck in a giant knot. The other notable gag is one where Eugene keeps running up and down 2 flights of stairs to deliver phone messages to Rick who is in the bath. Martin and Lewis have undeniable comedic chemistry, and it's a shame that the duo broke up a year later under unfriendly circumstances. Also noteworthy in this film is Shirley MacLaine who is absolutely up for slapstick hijinks as the love interest to Jerry Lewis.

They wanted to have me drowned when I was born, but the SPCA stopped them.

THE BELLBOY
1960 • Jerry Lewis
Paramount Pictures

Cast: Jerry Lewis, Alex Gerry, Bob Clayton, Milton Berle
Screenplay: Jerry Lewis

This film would mark Lewis' directorial debut. The film basically has no real plot, but instead is series of gags set in one set piece, a Miami hotel. It's quite a unique concept for the time, one that needed to be introduced by a "studio executive" at the open of the picture, but one that Lewis would reuse several times throughout his career. Lewis puts in a mostly silent performance as Stanley, a bumbling bellboy whose heart is in the right place, always willing to help, but always being berated by his superiors or managing to make a mess out of any situation. This type of short-form "set-up, punchline gag" is really where Lewis excels. He also is able, through his silent performance, able to generate a good deal of empathy for his character.  Lewis also appears as an obnoxious version of himself during the film as well. Lewis came up for the idea for the film while he was already staying at the hotel, contracted as a nightclub act. Paramount pressured him for a new film, so he used his surroundings as inspiration. He filmed during the day and performed at night. Lewis' friend, silent screen icon Stan Laurel, was consulted on the film and it shows in Lewis' performance.

CINDERFELLA
1960 • Frank Tashlin
Paramount Pictures

Cast: Jerry Lewis, Ed Wynn, Judith Anderson, Anna Maria Alberghetti
Screenplay: Frank Tashlin

Jerry Lewis stars as Fella, in this gender-swapped parody of the classic Cinderella fairy tale.  When his father dies, Fella continues to live with his wicked stepmother and his two good-for-nothing stepbrothers. In an update of the fairy tale, he's reduced to being their butler, while they scheme for a way to steal his inheritance. A beautiful princess is visiting, and the evil stepmother decides to throw a ball in order to marry off one of her two sons. Of course, this plan is interrupted by Fella, made handsome and dashing by his fairy GodFATHER (played by Ed Wynn).  The film plays out exactly as you think it would, with Fella falling in love with the beautiful princess and living happily ever after. Lewis ups the slapstick in possibly the wackiest film on this list.

Cinderfella: Hey, isn't he holding the future wife just a little too close?
Fairy Godfather: Oh, ho-ho! Stop worrying. She's all yours, every bit of her.
Cinderfella: Yeah, but I'd like to have the bits he's holding!

THE LADIES MAN
1961 • Jerry Lewis
Paramount Pictures

Cast: Jerry Lewis, Lillian Briggs, Helen Traubel, Kathleen Freeman, Buddy Lester, George Raft
Writer: Jerry Lewis

Lewis plays the unlikely named Herbert H. Heebert, a man who was scorned by love and swears off romance who unknowingly takes a job as the caretaker for an all-women boarding house. Because of course he does. Once again, not much plot to this and follows the formula THE BELLBOY started, with Lewis using the setting as an excuse for unrelated sight gags. What is striking about the film is that it does away with any pretense and celebrates its artificiality, at one point zooming out the camera so far that the audience can see the massive boarding school house is clearly a manufactured doll-house set. The set was a massive construction, at $350,000, the most expensive set ever designed for a comedy at the time. The "Hey, Lady!" line that is most often associated with Lewis comes from this film.

Hey, lady! 

THE ERRAND BOY
1961 • Jerry Lewis
Paramount Pictures

Cast:  Jerry Lewis, Brian Donlevy, Howard McNear, Dick Wesson
Writer: Jerry Lewis, Bill Richmond

IT'S A NUT AT HIS NUTTIEST!

Another set-up much like THE BELLBOY, in which the setting is just an excuse for a series of unrelated sight gags. In this film, the studio heads of "Paramutal Pictures" want to spy on their actors and employees, and they hire Morty Tashman (Lewis) as the man for the job. He has a job as an errand boy, and comes in contact with all the inner workings of the studio, reporting back what he sees.  Kind of a meta film for Lewis as he pokes fun at the behind the scenes of Hollywood and what "really goes on" when the cameras are off. Studio executives do not come off very well in this film, and the fact that by the end of the film Morty himself is an executive, speaks volumes of what Lewis thinks of the studio system. Subversion through absurdity.

THE NUTTY PROFESSOR
1963 • Jerry Lewis
Paramount Pictures

Cast: Jerry Lewis, Stella Stevens, Del Moore, Kathleen Freeman
Writer: Jerry Lewis, Bill Richmond

WHAT DOES HE BECOME? WHAT KIND OF MONSTER?

Perhaps the most famous of all Jerry Lewis roles. A break from his usual sketch films, Lewis returns to a narrative as he stars as Professor Kelp in this parody of Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Kelp is the stereotypical (and perhaps archetypal) nerd: thick glasses, mussed hair, buck teeth, bow-tie... the works. Sick of being bullied and not getting the girl, he creates a formula to make him a more alpha male. The serum works and transforms him into the smooth-talking, handsome and charming Buddy Love. The serum only lasts a few hours, however, and Professor Kelp always transforms back. This sets up a series of gags of Lewis alternating between the two personalities and having them crossover as he transitions from one to the other. This is my second Lewis performance on this list, as it really showcases his range in comedic styles. Though there are similarities, Lewis has always vehemently denied that Buddy Love was based on his old partner Dean Martin. The film remains his most iconic and spawned a remake in 1996 with Eddie Murphy in the title role. The film was included on AFI's list of 100 funniest comedies and was inducted into the National Film Registry as a culturally important and significant film. "Simpsons" fans should also note that Professor Frink is heavily inspired by Professor Kelp.

You're crazy about me, right? And I can understand it. Only this morning, looking in the mirror before shaving, I enjoyed seeing what I saw so much I couldn't tear myself away.

THE PATSY
1964 • Jerry Lewis
Paramount Pictures

Cast: Jerry Lewis, Ina Balin, Everett Sloane, Phil Harris, Keenan Wynn, Peter Lorre, John Carradine
Writer: Jerry Lewis, Bill Richmond

When a famous comedian dies, his parasitic management team fear for their job security. So they decide to manufacture a new comedy star out of their bumbling bellboy, Stanley.  Yes, another bellboy named Stanley. This is no coincidence as the film was originally planned as sequel to the 1960 hit.  Stanley is clearly untalented: he can't act, he can't sing, he can't dance and he's only funny by accident. Yet, they continue to pull strings for him to get him national attention. Eventually, the managers lose faith in him and to save themselves the embarrassment, fire him right before he takes the stage on the Ed Sullivan Show. And of course, he becomes a star. The film is notable for the amount of contemporary celebrities that make cameos in the film including  George Raft, Hedda Hopper, Ed Sullivan, Ed Wynn and Mel Tormé.  Not his best film by far, but features a decent amount of gags including montage of sequences of failed singing and acting lessons. Lewis always had a knack for casting strong supporting players and this film is no different, teeming with character actors Everett Sloane, Keenan Wynn and in his last film appearance, Peter Lorre. Another interesting skewering of the entertainment business by Lewis.

THE DISORDERLY ORDERLY
1964 • Frank Tashlin
Paramount Pictures

Cast: Jerry Lewis, Susan Oliver, Glenda Farrell, Kathleen Freeman, Karen Sharpe
Writers: Norm Liebermann, Ed Haas

Another set-up like THE BELLBOY and THE ERRAND BOY, with Lewis playing a hospital orderly with psychosomatic empathy for his patients. While most of the film is just set-ups for various gags, there is a thin narrative of Jerome (Lewis) falling for an old high school crush of his.  This is where the film takes a bit of a left turn from other wacky Lewis comedies. The crush, played by Susan Oliver, was admitted to the psychiatric wing for an attempted suicide. It treats the suicide narrative seriously, and Oliver's scenes are mostly played for drama, not for laughs. And here Lewis brings out the empathy from the audience through the eyes of his clownish character. It's quite a feat in an otherwise slapstick comedy.  The grand finale goes full hijinks, however, with Jerome stealing an ambulance in pursuit of his true love, Julie the nurse. 

- Can you drive an ambulance?
- Well, in the Army I drove a tank...

THE KING OF COMEDY
1982 • Martin Scorsese
20th Century Fox

Cast: Robert De Niro, Jerry Lewis, Tony Randall, Diahnne Abbott, Sandra Bernhard
Writer: Paul D. Zimmerman

NOBODY KNOWS RUPERT PUPKIN, BUT BY 11:30 TONIGHT, THE WHOLE WORLD WILL KNOW HE'S THE KING OF COMEDY

Jerry Lewis plays a supporting role to Robert De Niro in this Martin Scorsese black comedy about celebrity obsession.  De Niro is Rupert Pupkin, a deranged and mentally unstable aspiring stand up comedian who is looking for his next big break. He thinks he's made it big when he meets a Johnny Carson-esque talk show host Jerry Langford (Lewis), and tries to get booked on his show, without any luck. All the while, Rupert continually lives out a fantasy where he and Langford are friends and is constant presence on the talk show. His mania leads him to kidnap Langford, with the ransom being he gets to perform the opening monologue on Langford's show. The FBI grant him his request, and what follows is a masterful blending of reality by Scorsese, that the audience must decide what is real and what is Rupert's fantasy. While Johnny Carson (who refused), Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin were all considered for the role of Langford, it finally went to Lewis. Lewis wasn't in the Rat Pack, but he was Rat Pack adjacent, which lent him that show business vibe on top of his street cred as a comic to play a Carson-like role. It's actually perfect casting. The film premiered at Cannes, and Scorsese picked up a nomination for Best Director. Scorsese also picked up a BAFTA for the film. The film was well received by critics, but was a massive box office failure. This is a forgotten Scorsese masterpiece and, despite continuing to work into his 90s, a perfect bookend to Lewis' career. He should have picked up an Oscar for a Supporting role.

Better to be king for a night, than a schmuck for a lifetime.

Other Notable Performances:
  • AT WAR WITH THE ARMY (1950)
  • SCARED STIFF (1953)
  • THE CADDY (1953)
  • HOLLYWOOD OR BUST (1956)
  • ROCK-A-BYE BABY (1958)
  • THE GEISHA BOYS (1958)
  • WHO'S MINDING THE STORE? (1963)
  • THE FAMILY JEWELS (1965)
  • 3 ON A COUCH (1966)
  • MAX ROSE (2013)

Sunday, August 6, 2017

FORCED PERSPECTIVE, Ep. 99.2 – Ezekiel 25:17





YOUR favorite movie podcast, FORCED PERSPECTIVE, is proud to present the second of its final two episodes before the 100TH EPISODE SPECTACULAR! On this Episode 99, join SportsGuy515 and Adolfo as they add another entry into their MY FAVORITE FILM series by welcoming back BRANDON DRAVEN to discuss HIS favorite film – what many call Quentin Tarantino’s masterpiece – from 1994, it’s Pulp Fiction!

In Part 2, after laying some groundwork, the guys start recapping the film from start to finish and discuss why Pulp Fiction truly is 5-star film.

OVER AN HOUR OF GREAT FILM DISCUSSION!! SO MAKE SURE TO GRAB YOUR FIVE DOLLAR SHAKE AND DOWNLOAD/STREAM NOW!

Monday, July 31, 2017

The Essential Films Episode #014: Star Wars (1977)



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EPISODE DESCRIPTION

A long time ago, in a galaxy far far away. On today’s podcast adventure, Adolfo and Mark discuss the 1977 George Lucas classic: STAR WARS! On this week’s show:


  • Growing up Catholic as a Star Wars fan
  • More Alamo Drafthouse discussions
  • Christopher Nolan’s distaste for CGI
  • What’s the perfect date movie of 2017?
  • The Star Wars/San Diego Comic-Con connection
  • All the trailers coming out of Comic-Con 2017
  • Disney hunting down trailer leaks
  • Jeff Goldblum makes everything better
  • A tribute to Martin Landau, George Romero and John Heard
  • Star Wars’ 40th Anniversary
  • The many titles George Lucas went through before settling on “Star Wars”
  • Why is A New Hope so good? Was it a fluke?
  • George Lucas was not tested in a big budget environment
  • George Lucas, the world’s biggest independent filmmaker
  • Star Wars changed the movie licensing game
  • The complex ownership between 20th Century Fox and Disney
  • When did we first experience Star Wars?
  • The Special Edition releases in 1997
  • Star Wars action figures!
  • Fast Food Star Wars tie-ins
  • The multiple VHS releases
  • Star Wars as a holiday film
  • Why did Adolfo get in trouble when he saw Star Wars in theaters in 1997?
  • Who won that damn Star Wars Hummer?
  • When did “Star Wars” become “Episode IV: A New Hope”?
  • How the naming convention was inspired by the old chapter movies of the 30s and 40s
  • Serials were not meant to be watched all at once
  • How the film was plagued with multiple production problems
  • Hammer Horror icons Peter Cushing and his on-screen rival Christopher Lee both appeared as Star Wars villains
  • The use of CGI to bring back younger versions of older actors (or dead actors)
  • Empire of Dreams: the best documentary on Star Wars
  • How Star Wars changed the sci-fi game in the 70s
  • How the crew completely disrespected George Lucas
  • George Lucas: Control Freak
  • The New Hollywood directors
  • The director has final say on a film
  • What Brian De Palma and Steven Spielberg thought of the film when they saw the rough cut
  • “It rhymes.”
  • Why Jabba the Hutt isn’t needed in Star Wars Special Edition
  • Marcia Lucas is the real MVP
  • Star Wars: a space fairy tale
  • Did Lucas rip-off The Dam Busters?
  • David Prowse was not pleased he was dubbed over
  • The movie was really made in post-production
  • Ben Burtt: Sound genius
  • Inventing new technology just make the film
  • The birth of Industrial Light & Magic
  • How the Death Star trench run was filmed
  • The Prequels and their loyal defenders
  • The joint casting sessions for Star Wars and Carrie
  • Who was Mark Hammill’s competition for Luke Skywalker
  • The wacky names considered for Han Solo
  • Harrison Ford and Alec Guinness grew to resent the films
  • “I Was Going to Toshi Station to Pick Up Some Power Converters”
  • Is Princess Leia English?
  • Are you Luke Skywalker or Han Solo?
  • The great chemistry between Fisher, Ford and Hammil
  • Anthony Daniels does not have a career outside of C-3PO
  • The inspiration for C-3PO and R2D2
  • The second act problems of Return of the Jedi
  • Boba Fett: a great looking character without substance
  • What is the proper viewing order of the saga?
  • What Adolfo considers to be the WORST Star Wars movie
  • The most recognizable movie theme of all time
  • Star Wars launched a merchandising empire
  • Adolfo’s vintage Burger King Star Wars glasses
  • The “Empty Box” campaign
  • The Star Wars Holiday Special
  • Prequels, sequels, spin-offs and sequels
  • “When will then be now?” “Soon”
  • George Lucas can’t leave well enough alone
  • How can you watch the original theatrical versions (legally). Hint, it involves going on eBay and some outdated technology
  • The “De-Specialized” Editions
  • Han shoots first!




FILM REFERENCES IN THIS EPISODE:

  • FLASH GORDON (1936)
  • BATMAN (1943)
  • CAPTAIN AMERICA (1944)
  • BATMAN AND ROBIN (1949)
  • THE DAM BUSTERS (1955)
  • THE HIDDEN FORTRESS (1958)
  • NORTH BY NORTHWEST (1959)
  • NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968)
  • PLANET OF THE APES (1968)
  • THX 1138 (1971)
  • A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (1971)
  • AMERICAN GRAFFITI (1973)
  • THE GODFATHER PART II (1974)
  • JAWS (1975)
  • LOGAN’S RUN (1976)
  • CARRIE (1976)
  • DAWN OF THE DEAD (1978)
  • SUPERMAN: THE MOVIE (1978)
  • THE STAR WARS HOLIDAY SPECIAL (1978)
  • MAD MAX (1979)
  • STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE (1979)
  • THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (1980)
  • RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981)
  • THE GREATEST AMERICAN HERO (TV Series, 1981-1983)
  • BLADE RUNNER (1982)
  • RETURN OF THE JEDI (1983)
  • THE A-TEAM (TV Series, 1983-1987)
  • SCARFACE (1983)
  • A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (1984)
  • MUPPET BABIES (TV Series, 1984-1991)
  • BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985)
  • DAY OF THE DEAD (1985)
  • STAR WARS: DROIDS (TV Series, 1985-1986)
  • BIG (1988)
  • SPACEBALLS (1988)
  • CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS (1989)
  • HOME ALONE (1990)
  • JURASSIC PARK (1993)
  • ED WOOD (1994)
  • PULP FICTION (1994)
  • BATMAN FOREVER (1995)
  • THE ADVENTURES OF PINOCCHIO (1996)
  • BATMAN & ROBIN (1997)
  • THE IRON GIANT (1999)
  • THE SOPRANOS (TV Series, 1999-2007)
  • STAR WARS: EPISODE I - THE PHANTOM MENACE (1999)
  • HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER’S STONE (2001)
  • STAR WARS: EPISODE II - ATTACK OF THE CLONES (2002)
  • PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL (2003)
  • EMPIRE OF DREAMS: THE STORY OF THE STAR WARS TRILOGY (2004)
  • STAR WARS: EPISODE III - REVENGE OF THE SITH (2005)
  • STAR WARS: THE FORCE UNLEASHED (Video Game, 2008)
  • THE WALKING DEAD (TV Series, 2010-Present)
  • THOR (2011)
  • THOR: THE DARK WORLD (2014)
  • GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY (2014)
  • STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS (2015)
  • ANT-MAN (2015)
  • ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY (2016)
  • CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR (2016)
  • DUNKIRK (2017)
  • WAR OF THE PLANET FOR THE APES (2017)
  • SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (2017)
  • THE BIG SICK (2017)
  • GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2 (2017)
  • READY PLAYER ONE (2018)
  • AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (2018)
  • JUSTICE LEAGUE (2018)
  • THOR: RAGNAROK (2018)



LINKS:
Star Wars glasses
Harmy’s Despecialized Editions

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